Photo 14 Apr ohhipeskypie:

"Trembling Idle Hands, Holding Me There"

Photography | Redrum Collaboration
Model | Pesky Suicide
MUAH | Sarah Bortner of MyBigHairDay
Concept & Styling: “Philly Gone Tribal” | Amanda Valentine
High-waisted Skirt by Melissa Haley

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

ohhipeskypie:

"Trembling Idle Hands, Holding Me There"
Photography | Redrum Collaboration
MUAH | Sarah Bortner of MyBigHairDay
Concept & Styling: “Philly Gone Tribal” | Amanda Valentine
High-waisted Skirt by Melissa Haley

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Photo 14 Apr medievalpoc:

roslynholcomb:

roslynholcomb:

medievalpoc:

Okay, so. This cameo brooch is almost certainly Italian, and almost certainly from the 1800s. Unfortunately, I did a terrible thing and apparently didn’t save the info that goes with it. And there is no way to do an image analysis search because I didn’t grab it online. :| *infinite facepalm* So if anyone has an artist or source for this cameo, please feel free to add it. I had been saving it for the last 1800s Week, but alas, my digging turned up nothing. It is, however, remarkable, and I still wanted to put it out there.

I collect cameos and I’m going to need a replica of this IMMEDIATELY! How freaking awesome! I haven’t seen any other cameos with POC on them. Absolutely gorgeous. Now I’m off to see if I can find others. 

I didn’t find an exact replica, but I found this Pinterest board that’s chockfull of cameos with POC. Many of them are similar to this one. Not all are antique, but many are. http://www.pinterest.com/cbyk/blackamoor-and-black-cameos/

Definitely interesting!
I also wanted to point out that there is a significant difference between portrait bust cameos featuring Black people, and the “Blackamoor Brooch” fashion in jewelry, which is a racist caricature.
Although this article from Racialicious oversimplifies or misinterprets some of the symbolism and style of depictions of Black people in European art of the Renaissance and Baroque “periods”, it does a good job of showing how many modern white celebrities and fashion designers seem to think using, profiting from, or promoting that kind of imagery is somehow okay. It’s not.
A simple Google image search demonstrates that there are so many variations on and individual items of “Blackamoor” derivation they almost completely flood out other images, and that is why I generally do not feature them on this blog. Portrait or art cameos are different; they are artistic depictions of people, probably using a live model. Sadly, this can cause people who are looking at what is essentially a contextually neutral representation of a Black person in European art to see a stereotype.
^ This is also what I mean when I talk about how our culture NOW massively affects how we view artwork from the past, especially in regard to race.
I have often discussed how which images are available and easily accessible affect AND reflect our society, culture, and dominant narrative. The ubiquity of specifically anti-Black imagery like the “Blackamoor”, as opposed to ones like the portrait cameo above, serves to further the misinformation that racist stereotypes always existed, when in fact their invention can be traced, documented, and explored like any other topic in sociopolitical history.
As I have done research for this project, I have noticed that accurate and individual portraits of Black people in European art history aren’t lacking, it’s just that many of them have been drowned out by the clamor of more recent racist, stereotypical images. Attaching this history of objectification and dehumanization to Black people living today, along with the omission of sensitive and accurate portraiture, serves anti-Blackness today, and will continue to do so if we allow it.

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

medievalpoc:

roslynholcomb:

roslynholcomb:

medievalpoc:

Okay, so. This cameo brooch is almost certainly Italian, and almost certainly from the 1800s. Unfortunately, I did a terrible thing and apparently didn’t save the info that goes with it. And there is no way to do an image analysis search because I didn’t grab it online. :| *infinite facepalm* So if anyone has an artist or source for this cameo, please feel free to add it. I had been saving it for the last 1800s Week, but alas, my digging turned up nothing. It is, however, remarkable, and I still wanted to put it out there.

I collect cameos and I’m going to need a replica of this IMMEDIATELY! How freaking awesome! I haven’t seen any other cameos with POC on them. Absolutely gorgeous. Now I’m off to see if I can find others. 

I didn’t find an exact replica, but I found this Pinterest board that’s chockfull of cameos with POC. Many of them are similar to this one. Not all are antique, but many are. http://www.pinterest.com/cbyk/blackamoor-and-black-cameos/

Definitely interesting!

I also wanted to point out that there is a significant difference between portrait bust cameos featuring Black people, and the “Blackamoor Brooch” fashion in jewelry, which is a racist caricature.

Although this article from Racialicious oversimplifies or misinterprets some of the symbolism and style of depictions of Black people in European art of the Renaissance and Baroque “periods”, it does a good job of showing how many modern white celebrities and fashion designers seem to think using, profiting from, or promoting that kind of imagery is somehow okay. It’s not.

A simple Google image search demonstrates that there are so many variations on and individual items of “Blackamoor” derivation they almost completely flood out other images, and that is why I generally do not feature them on this blog. Portrait or art cameos are different; they are artistic depictions of people, probably using a live model. Sadly, this can cause people who are looking at what is essentially a contextually neutral representation of a Black person in European art to see a stereotype.

^ This is also what I mean when I talk about how our culture NOW massively affects how we view artwork from the past, especially in regard to race.

I have often discussed how which images are available and easily accessible affect AND reflect our society, culture, and dominant narrative. The ubiquity of specifically anti-Black imagery like the “Blackamoor”, as opposed to ones like the portrait cameo above, serves to further the misinformation that racist stereotypes always existed, when in fact their invention can be traced, documented, and explored like any other topic in sociopolitical history.

As I have done research for this project, I have noticed that accurate and individual portraits of Black people in European art history aren’t lacking, it’s just that many of them have been drowned out by the clamor of more recent racist, stereotypical images. Attaching this history of objectification and dehumanization to Black people living today, along with the omission of sensitive and accurate portraiture, serves anti-Blackness today, and will continue to do so if we allow it.

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Photo 14 Apr Identity of the African Diaspora: An Evolution of Identifying Terms
The terms used to describe members of the African Diaspora have evolved throughout the last couple of centuries. Identities have taken shape often based on the region in which African descendants currently live. The majority of people, who used to be categorized solely as ‘black’, are in search of a term which identifies them as people who are part of a larger culture and not one that necessarily reflects their race and skin color. The modern debate over an identifying name took shape during the African slave trade when the first Africans were shipped to the Americas and the Caribbean. The vast majority of Africans wanted to be referred to as African. However the non-African population referred to Africans either as slaves or free. Thus began the reference to people as an adjective and not a noun. Soon Africans and African descendants rejected the term ‘African’ because a negative connotation evolved through the ideas of European descendants. ‘African’ came to symbolize a sub-human identity because Africans were seen as ‘barbaric’ and ‘ape-like’. With the end of the nineteenth century, adjectives started to transform into nouns as identifying terms for African descendants. The term ‘Colored’ became customary when describing all people who were ‘non-white’. However this was replaced with the term ‘Negro’ in the early twentieth century due to the fact that segregation was on a rise and signs above public facilities appeared all over the United States indicating which facility could be used by the ‘Colored’ or by the ‘Whites’. Segregation fueled racism and the terms, ‘Colored’ and ‘Negro’, were perceived as racist by the time of the 1950s and 60s’ Civil Rights Movement. Currently the only acceptable use of the term ‘Colored’ is in the organizational title of the NAACP (the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). In the 1960s many African Americans were rediscovering their African roots. Hairstyles such as the Afro were becoming popular and slogans such as ‘Black is Beautiful’ were chanted by many. “Say It Loud: I’m Black and I’m Proud”, was a song by James Brown which demonstrated the rise of ‘Black Pride’ in the 1960s. With this rise of Black awareness, the distinction on who was ‘Black’ changed. Although ‘Black’ still referred to the color of one’s skin, now it referred only to African descendants and no longer encompassed dark-skinned individuals such as Italians or Mexicans. However, this remained problematic because it referred to anyone originating from African descendants, such as people from the Caribbean, even though these possessed a highly distinct culture. Not all African descendants welcomed the surfacing of the term ‘Black’ because they felt it was similar to the term ‘Negro’ which was now seen as a racist term. But for the most part many accepted the term ‘Black’ and it is still considered acceptable in the USA and other parts of the world today. The term ‘Afro-American’ developed during the rise of hyphenated terms to describe American minority groups in the 1970s and 1980s. Soon the term evolved into ‘African-American’ and finally into ‘African American’ with it losing the hyphen. The hyphen was removed because many believed that it implied a sub-category. ‘African American’ was adopted quickly by many because many African descendants in the USA did not identify themselves as ‘Black’. However, this terminology does not satisfy everyone because many also believe that there is nothing African about them. It is now widely accepted as the politically correct terminology for Americans of African descendant although it is understood that one term cannot contain all the information required to accurately represent a population of over forty million people. Today, members of the African Diaspora associate themselves with Africa through the terms with which they identify. Many African descendants believe that the usage of ‘African’ when being identified is a way of circling back to their roots of Africa which carried a stigma for a long time. When polled by the online Village forum associated with the Blacknet website, 40% of African descendants living in Great Britain wished to be called African British while almost half that number, 24%, wished to be called Black. Many believe that the English language has oppressed African people by constantly using adjectives instead of nouns when referring to an ethnic group. With the desire to be recognized and connected with their heritage and not described according to their skin color, many prefer the reference to Africa when identifying them. Afro-Latinos acknowledge their black identity but do not accept it as a means of identification. Although many people would expect Afro-Dominicans to share the same level of identification with blackness as African Americans do, many Afro-Dominicans believe that being black places them into the same social category which African Americans associate with racism and discrimination. Afro-Latinos in the USA also do not identify with the African Americans. For many Afro-Latinos, African American means that someone is born in the USA with African ancestry and not Hispanic heritage. However, the longer an Afro-Latino remains in the USA, the more likely he/she will identify him/herself as being black just like the African American. These diversities and complexities pertinent to members of the African Diaspora make it difficult to claim a common identity. Although many share broad similarities, African descendants do not believe these similarities are enough to associate all under the same umbrella. Every region of the world that African descendants live in has unique aspects for understanding the logic behind the terminology desired by them. History, culture, and political institutions have all been factors which have shaped racial identities throughout the world.
descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Identity of the African Diaspora: An Evolution of Identifying Terms

The terms used to describe members of the African Diaspora have evolved throughout the last couple of centuries. Identities have taken shape often based on the region in which African descendants currently live. The majority of people, who used to be categorized solely as ‘black’, are in search of a term which identifies them as people who are part of a larger culture and not one that necessarily reflects their race and skin color. 

The modern debate over an identifying name took shape during the African slave trade when the first Africans were shipped to the Americas and the Caribbean. The vast majority of Africans wanted to be referred to as African. However the non-African population referred to Africans either as slaves or free. Thus began the reference to people as an adjective and not a noun. Soon Africans and African descendants rejected the term ‘African’ because a negative connotation evolved through the ideas of European descendants. ‘African’ came to symbolize a sub-human identity because Africans were seen as ‘barbaric’ and ‘ape-like’. With the end of the nineteenth century, adjectives started to transform into nouns as identifying terms for African descendants. The term ‘Colored’ became customary when describing all people who were ‘non-white’. However this was replaced with the term ‘Negro’ in the early twentieth century due to the fact that segregation was on a rise and signs above public facilities appeared all over the United States indicating which facility could be used by the ‘Colored’ or by the ‘Whites’. Segregation fueled racism and the terms, ‘Colored’ and ‘Negro’, were perceived as racist by the time of the 1950s and 60s’ Civil Rights Movement. Currently the only acceptable use of the term ‘Colored’ is in the organizational title of the NAACP (the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). 

In the 1960s many African Americans were rediscovering their African roots. Hairstyles such as the Afro were becoming popular and slogans such as ‘Black is Beautiful’ were chanted by many. “Say It Loud: I’m Black and I’m Proud”, was a song by James Brown which demonstrated the rise of ‘Black Pride’ in the 1960s. With this rise of Black awareness, the distinction on who was ‘Black’ changed. Although ‘Black’ still referred to the color of one’s skin, now it referred only to African descendants and no longer encompassed dark-skinned individuals such as Italians or Mexicans. However, this remained problematic because it referred to anyone originating from African descendants, such as people from the Caribbean, even though these possessed a highly distinct culture. Not all African descendants welcomed the surfacing of the term ‘Black’ because they felt it was similar to the term ‘Negro’ which was now seen as a racist term. But for the most part many accepted the term ‘Black’ and it is still considered acceptable in the USA and other parts of the world today. 

The term ‘Afro-American’ developed during the rise of hyphenated terms to describe American minority groups in the 1970s and 1980s. Soon the term evolved into ‘African-American’ and finally into ‘African American’ with it losing the hyphen. The hyphen was removed because many believed that it implied a sub-category. ‘African American’ was adopted quickly by many because many African descendants in the USA did not identify themselves as ‘Black’. However, this terminology does not satisfy everyone because many also believe that there is nothing African about them. It is now widely accepted as the politically correct terminology for Americans of African descendant although it is understood that one term cannot contain all the information required to accurately represent a population of over forty million people. 

Today, members of the African Diaspora associate themselves with Africa through the terms with which they identify. Many African descendants believe that the usage of ‘African’ when being identified is a way of circling back to their roots of Africa which carried a stigma for a long time. When polled by the online Village forum associated with the Blacknet website, 40% of African descendants living in Great Britain wished to be called African British while almost half that number, 24%, wished to be called Black. Many believe that the English language has oppressed African people by constantly using adjectives instead of nouns when referring to an ethnic group. With the desire to be recognized and connected with their heritage and not described according to their skin color, many prefer the reference to Africa when identifying them. 

Afro-Latinos acknowledge their black identity but do not accept it as a means of identification. Although many people would expect Afro-Dominicans to share the same level of identification with blackness as African Americans do, many Afro-Dominicans believe that being black places them into the same social category which African Americans associate with racism and discrimination. Afro-Latinos in the USA also do not identify with the African Americans. For many Afro-Latinos, African American means that someone is born in the USA with African ancestry and not Hispanic heritage. However, the longer an Afro-Latino remains in the USA, the more likely he/she will identify him/herself as being black just like the African American. 

These diversities and complexities pertinent to members of the African Diaspora make it difficult to claim a common identity. Although many share broad similarities, African descendants do not believe these similarities are enough to associate all under the same umbrella. Every region of the world that African descendants live in has unique aspects for understanding the logic behind the terminology desired by them. History, culture, and political institutions have all been factors which have shaped racial identities throughout the world.

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Video 14 Apr

From the top; New Zealand, North America, Alaska and Africa. Any questions?

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Google it!! You don’t have to believe me. As my father always said, you couldn’t pay me to make this up. Everyone came from Africa and the evidence is omnipresent. 

Photo 14 Apr thescowlingdaedreemha:

Africa…The Continent

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

thescowlingdaedreemha:

Africa…The Continent

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

(Source: howiviewafrica)

via .
Video 14 Apr

eboni-health-advisor:

#Nutrition #MensHealth #Dopamine #Sugar #Fructose #ADHD #ADD #Cleansing #Medication #Viagara #ED #Chelation #Holistic #Doctors #Arteries #Supplements #Herbs #Homeopathic #Hearthealth #Thyroid 

This woman knows her stuff and this is one of the best health videos I have seen in years. She gives full knowledge of Natural Healing in less than 9 minutes. This video will change your life and the way you look at medicine, aspirin and the medical industry. Vitamin E with Selenium is a natural alternative to Aspirin.

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Video 14 Apr

When watching Jeopardy today I learned about this Glossary / Reference set the Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African-American Experience edited by Professor and Historian Henry Louis Gates and Anthony Appiah is a compendium of Africana studies including African studies and the “Pan-African diaspora” inspired by W. E. B.

This would make a great gift for Christmas, College, Prep/ Boarding, Junior or High School.

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Photo 14 Apr HETEROSEXUALITY IS THE ONLY SEXUAL ORIENTATION THAT AFRICANS HAVE PARTAKEN IN!!
They vibrated on the Djehutic and Ma’atic thought process in tune with the divine mathematical aspects of nature and the cosmos. They knew that certain equations functions and modalities achieved certain results. The split polarity between the feminine and masculine energies was something that they didn’t pervert.
If we look at the Hermetic Texts written down by our Kemetic ancestors, and translated by our Moorish Ancestors we see the 7 principles of Existence that they taught to the Albion in the major universities that they set up. These are:
     1. The Principle of Mentalism.
    2. The Principle of Correspondence.
    3. The Principle of Vibration.
    4. The Principle of Polarity.
    5. The Principle of Rhythm.
    6. The Principle of Cause and Effect.
    7. THE PRINCIPLE OF GENDER
Play close attention to the seventh one. What did they write down about it? What did they seek to teach the Albion?
This Principle embodies the truth that there is GENDER manifested in everything — the Masculine and Feminine Principles ever at work. This is true not only of the Physical Plane, but of the Mental and even the Spiritual Planes. On the Physical Plane, the Principle manifests as SEX, on the higher planes it takes higher forms, but the Principle is ever the same. No creation, physical, mental or spiritual, is possible without this Principle. An understanding of its laws will throw light on many a subject that has perplexed the minds of men. The Principle of Gender works ever in the direction of generation, regeneration, and creation. Everything, and every person, contains the two Elements or Principles, or this great Principle, within it, him or her. Every Male thing has the Female Element also; every Female contains also the Male Principle [each gender enhances itself through the cohabitation and copulation with the other ]. If you would understand the philosophy of Mental and Spiritual Creation, Generation, and Re-generation, you must understand and study this Hermetic Principle. It contains the solution of many mysteries of Life. We caution you that this Principle has no reference to the many base, pernicious and degrading lustful theories, teachings and practices[pedophilia bestiality, fetishism etc.], which are taught under fanciful titles, and which are a prostitution of the great natural principle of Gender. Such base revivals of the ancient infamous forms of Phallicism[male homosexuality] tend to ruin mind, body and soul, and the Hermetic Philosophy has ever sounded the warning note against these degraded teachings which tend toward lust, licentiousness, and perversion of Nature’s principles. If you seek such teachings, you must go elsewhere for them — Hermeticism contains nothing for you along these lines. To the pure, all things are pure; to the base, all things are base.
Please realize that our ancestors did not have this debate. Their was a split scientific mathematical Definition of what Gender and Sexuality was.

WTF. There is Gay marriage in South Africa and Millions of Gay men/women in Africa, North America, South America and the Caribbean who are muslim, christian, etc. Only a fool would think otherwise.  In fact, the lesbians in Africa get raped so much that they have to hang in packs to protect themselves. There are men in Africa who have 12 wives and those who have one wife cheat just like any other man in the world. So is a man who is a womanizer or rapist better than a Gay man? African men raping little girls to cure themselves of Aids because the Voodoo Witch Doctor told them to do so. In West Africa women have their Labia stretched just to please their mate and there are even more African, Muslim, Persian/Middle Eastern women who are getting castrated and sewed up to prevent them from straying. When they get pregnant they often die from labor complications or infections from the castration or narrow walls of their vagina or vaginal openings. A baby simply can’t come out of a whole that has been shut tight just for the pleasure of a man. I am also mindful that because of the way women are treated that their is a rise in the feminist movement which further divided us.  
Here are one of the oldest documented Gay couples in history from Africa, Egypt
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khnumhotep_and_Niankhkhnum
Here is some history on Gay Native Americans before Christopher Columbus or Europeans even made contact with them.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Spirited
Homosexuality in Ancient India
http://www.indiandost.com/anciant.php
 Do you need more references? 
Denying Homosexual history in Africa is just as bad as denying that Black inventions and certain patents that only whites benefited from in production. Stop the madness and choose your battles wisley. Africa has enough issues to deal with then to be wasting time worrying about Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Lesbians. Its not why the country is facing deep famine, racial genocide, Aids, Genital mutilation; Diamond, Ivory, Oil and theft among many of other resources! We need unity not division. Worry about those White and Asian investors who are robbing and raping Africa. 

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

HETEROSEXUALITY IS THE ONLY SEXUAL ORIENTATION THAT AFRICANS HAVE PARTAKEN IN!!

They vibrated on the Djehutic and Ma’atic thought process in tune with the divine mathematical aspects of nature and the cosmos. They knew that certain equations functions and modalities achieved certain results. The split polarity between the feminine and masculine energies was something that they didn’t pervert.

If we look at the Hermetic Texts written down by our Kemetic ancestors, and translated by our Moorish Ancestors we see the 7 principles of Existence that they taught to the Albion in the major universities that they set up. These are:

     1. The Principle of Mentalism.

    2. The Principle of Correspondence.

    3. The Principle of Vibration.

    4. The Principle of Polarity.

    5. The Principle of Rhythm.

    6. The Principle of Cause and Effect.

    7. THE PRINCIPLE OF GENDER

Play close attention to the seventh one. What did they write down about it? What did they seek to teach the Albion?

This Principle embodies the truth that there is GENDER manifested in everything — the Masculine and Feminine Principles ever at work. This is true not only of the Physical Plane, but of the Mental and even the Spiritual Planes. On the Physical Plane, the Principle manifests as SEX, on the higher planes it takes higher forms, but the Principle is ever the same. No creation, physical, mental or spiritual, is possible without this Principle. An understanding of its laws will throw light on many a subject that has perplexed the minds of men. The Principle of Gender works ever in the direction of generation, regeneration, and creation. Everything, and every person, contains the two Elements or Principles, or this great Principle, within it, him or her. Every Male thing has the Female Element also; every Female contains also the Male Principle [each gender enhances itself through the cohabitation and copulation with the other ]. If you would understand the philosophy of Mental and Spiritual Creation, Generation, and Re-generation, you must understand and study this Hermetic Principle. It contains the solution of many mysteries of Life. We caution you that this Principle has no reference to the many base, pernicious and degrading lustful theories, teachings and practices[pedophilia bestiality, fetishism etc.], which are taught under fanciful titles, and which are a prostitution of the great natural principle of Gender. Such base revivals of the ancient infamous forms of Phallicism[male homosexuality] tend to ruin mind, body and soul, and the Hermetic Philosophy has ever sounded the warning note against these degraded teachings which tend toward lust, licentiousness, and perversion of Nature’s principles. If you seek such teachings, you must go elsewhere for them — Hermeticism contains nothing for you along these lines. To the pure, all things are pure; to the base, all things are base.

Please realize that our ancestors did not have this debate. Their was a split scientific mathematical Definition of what Gender and Sexuality was.

image

WTF. There is Gay marriage in South Africa and Millions of Gay men/women in Africa, North America, South America and the Caribbean who are muslim, christian, etc. Only a fool would think otherwise.  In fact, the lesbians in Africa get raped so much that they have to hang in packs to protect themselves. There are men in Africa who have 12 wives and those who have one wife cheat just like any other man in the world. So is a man who is a womanizer or rapist better than a Gay man? African men raping little girls to cure themselves of Aids because the Voodoo Witch Doctor told them to do so. In West Africa women have their Labia stretched just to please their mate and there are even more African, Muslim, Persian/Middle Eastern women who are getting castrated and sewed up to prevent them from straying. When they get pregnant they often die from labor complications or infections from the castration or narrow walls of their vagina or vaginal openings. A baby simply can’t come out of a whole that has been shut tight just for the pleasure of a man. I am also mindful that because of the way women are treated that their is a rise in the feminist movement which further divided us.  

Here are one of the oldest documented Gay couples in history from Africa, Egypt

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khnumhotep_and_Niankhkhnum

Here is some history on Gay Native Americans before Christopher Columbus or Europeans even made contact with them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Spirited

Homosexuality in Ancient India

http://www.indiandost.com/anciant.php

 Do you need more references? 

Denying Homosexual history in Africa is just as bad as denying that Black inventions and certain patents that only whites benefited from in production. Stop the madness and choose your battles wisley. Africa has enough issues to deal with then to be wasting time worrying about Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Lesbians. Its not why the country is facing deep famine, racial genocide, Aids, Genital mutilation; Diamond, Ivory, Oil and theft among many of other resources! We need unity not division. Worry about those White and Asian investors who are robbing and raping Africa. 

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

(Source: kushitekalkulus)

Video 8 Apr

Behind the Headline: Barack Obama vs. the Culture of Poverty

Two giants of the blogosphere, Jonathan Chait of New York magazine and Ta-Nehisi Coates of the Atlantic, have been engaging in an epic debate this month over the concept of “the culture of poverty.”

Coates kicked off the debate in mid-March after Paul Ryan made a speech in which he talked about the problem of men in the inner cities not  working. Ryan attributed the problem to the culture of the inner cities. Coates argued that this view of the culture of our inner cities has become widely accepted even by progressives, who no longer pay much attention to other causes of poverty, such as racism.

Chait responded by saying that progressives — and President Obama — are not saying that inner city culture is the only cause of poverty. They believe that culture contributes to poverty but is not the only cause.

Coates responded with a long piece citing numerous historical sources in defense of the idea that white racism is and has always been more of a problem than black people not “holding up their end of the bargain” or being in need of moral instruction.

Chait answers that to identify the culture of poverty as a contributor to poverty does not require blaming people for their failures or considering them irresponsible or immoral. It can mean simply that young people may grow up around cultural norms that inhibit their later success.

Chait continues

People are the products of their environment. Environments are amenable to public policy. Some of the most successful anti-poverty initiatives, like the Harlem Children’s Zone or the KIPP schools, are designed around the premise that children raised in concentrated poverty need to be taught middle class norms.

An Ed Next article by David Whitman, “An Appeal to Authority: The New Paternalism in Urban Schools,” looks closely at how schools like KIPP seek to impart middle class values. Whitman describes these schools as paternalistic, but what he means by this is not imposing values that are foreign, but rather, helping to support values that are already embraced by people in the community. Whitman notes that

Paternalistic programs survive only because they typically enforce values that “clients already believe,” [Lawrence] Mead notes. But many paternalistic programs remain controversial because they seek to change the lifestyles of the poor, immigrants, and minorities, rather than the lifestyles of middle-class and upper-class families. The paternalistic presumption implicit in the schools is that the poor lack the family and community support, cultural capital, and personal follow-through to live according to the middle-class values that they, too, espouse.

Whitman’s article, which includes a longer discussion of paternalism and culture, is drawn from his book Sweating the Small Stuff: Inner-City Schools and the New Paternalism.

http://educationnext.org/behind-headline-barack-obama-vs-culture-poverty/

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Quote 7 Apr
The Europeans are not yet willing to acknowledge that the world did not wait in darkness for them to bring the light, and that the history of Africa was already old when Europe was born.
— 

John Henrik Clarke, “Education for a New Reality in the African World” (1994)

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

(Source: z-unit)

Text 6 Apr Anonymous Question from an Asian ( Indian American )

Hi! I read your post about Indians being closest descendants of Africa. I have a question about that. Does that include all of India or south India more so? I still have much research to do on the migration but I know northern Indians/Pakistani/Iranians descended from Aryans who migrated from in Eurasia. Would they be considered closer relatives too or just the Dravidians? (Private message is greatly appreciated).

My Reply: 

Everyone came from Africa including Pakistan and Iran. What archeologist have discovered is that migration caused many of us to have lighter pigment and different textures of hair to name just a few while other remained in much warmer climates where people produce more pigment. Settling in certain climates cause many our ancestors features to change to adjust to that climate. So your right Northern Indians/Pakistani/Iranians descended from Aryans but Aryans came from Africa. There has always been back and forth migration. Look up Bushmen or Bushpeople of South Africa. They have fair skin, Asian features and bodies.

We are evolving again. If you noticed people are getting taller, heavier, less intelligent in some ways, less productive because of technology and very unfamiliar with living off the land. We now depend on others to feed us which is scary. We have lost the skills to farm and hunt. There are disadvantages and advantages to having darker or lighter skin, Do you know what they are ?

The Siddi people are another group of Indians also known as (Urduشیدی ‎; Kannada: ಸಿದ್ಧಿಗಳು; HindiMarathiKonkani: सिद्दी or शीदि/ಸಿದ್ಧಿ; Sindhi: شيدي; Gujarati: સીદી), also known as SiddhiSheedi, Habshi or Makrani, are an ethnic group inhabiting India and Pakistan. Members are descended from Bantu peoples from Southeast Africa that were brought to the Indian subcontinent as slaves by Arab and Portuguese merchants. The Siddi community is currently estimated at around 20,000–55,000 individuals, with KarnatakaGujarat and Hyderabad in India and Makran and Karachi in Pakistan as the main population centres. Siddis are primarily Sufi Muslims, although some are Hindus and others Roman Catholic Christians.

So, we are all related but the Darker people from the subcontinent are our closest relatives and India even has African Indian tribes that still exist that live on reservations. Aryans aren’t a race they are just people who look different in the same way that Asians aren’t a race of people We share more physical characteristics with . There are no pure races just different genetics. By the way I don’t like posting inbox conversations cause its rude and uncivilized. :-)  Educated people of color ( latino, asian, caribbean, african, native american etc) are well aware that although some of us may look whiter that unless you are white you not considered equal by white people. Unless you speak, dress or act like a European you will always be seen as an outsider or  indigenous which happens to be most of the worlds population. White people have colonized on every continent, forced their religion, languages, fashion and morals on everyone, killed millions of Jews, Africans, Aboriginal people of Australia and Native Americans of North America and South America so if you want to be related to that group of people as opposed to africans by all means your welcomed to. :-) I will love you the same. 

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Photo 6 Apr fyblackwomenart:

mama africa by Noblackcolor
descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

 

fyblackwomenart:

mama africa
by Noblackcolor

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

 

Video 30 Mar

Before the album there was the book. :-) 

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Photo 30 Mar africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Nayyirah Waheed”
We need more students in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) field they say. We need more students in the medical field. We need more doctors, more engineers, more computer scientists, more nurses, and more biologists. But I beg to differ. I think we need more psychologists. More anthropologists, more dancers, singers, painters, and most importantly we need more writers… more poets.
Who will tell our stories?
We need more writers who will preserve our history. We need more poets who will pass down our sacred folktales from one generation to the next.
We need poetry
Poetry has the power to ignite an unquenchable fire in a person’s soul. It has the power to reach beyond the realm of the conscious mind with its sounds and rhythms. It crosses boundaries that other forms of expression fail to transcend.
We need more writers. We need more poets.
We need more Nayyirah Waheeds.
Nayyirah Waheed is U.S. based writer who began writing at the tender age of 11 after a teacher assigned an assignment that required the class to write a poem to put into a community newspaper. From that assignment, Nayyirah discovered a new medium for self-expression. From the age of 11 till now, Nayyirah Waheed has blossomed into a powerful poet/artist and woman. She is currently working on her first published work, to be released September 2013.
Rise Africa received the opportunity to talk to Nayyirah Waheed, here’s what she had to say.

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Nayyirah Waheed”

We need more students in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) field they say. We need more students in the medical field. We need more doctors, more engineers, more computer scientists, more nurses, and more biologists. But I beg to differ. I think we need more psychologists. More anthropologists, more dancers, singers, painters, and most importantly we need more writers… more poets.

Who will tell our stories?

We need more writers who will preserve our history. We need more poets who will pass down our sacred folktales from one generation to the next.

We need poetry

Poetry has the power to ignite an unquenchable fire in a person’s soul. It has the power to reach beyond the realm of the conscious mind with its sounds and rhythms. It crosses boundaries that other forms of expression fail to transcend.

We need more writers. We need more poets.

We need more Nayyirah Waheeds.

Nayyirah Waheed is U.S. based writer who began writing at the tender age of 11 after a teacher assigned an assignment that required the class to write a poem to put into a community newspaper. From that assignment, Nayyirah discovered a new medium for self-expression. From the age of 11 till now, Nayyirah Waheed has blossomed into a powerful poet/artist and woman. She is currently working on her first published work, to be released September 2013.

Rise Africa received the opportunity to talk to Nayyirah Waheed, here’s what she had to say.

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

Photo 30 Mar descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive

descendants-of-brown-royalty.tumblr.com/archive


Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.